Yo-yoers react to the fidget spinners fad

I got into yo-yoing in early 1998, just before a massive yo-yo craze swept the world. For the next two years, there were contests in every major city, yo-yos in every corner store, and most schools had some sort of temporary ban on the toy. Since then I’ve seen several different toy fads come and go, including kendamas, hoverboards, tech decks, and razer scooters.

If it wasn’t for that first yo-yo fad, it’s hard to imagine how different my life would be today. I received a couple cool trophies (3rd place World Champ & National Trick Innovator being my two faves), became a regional manager of several yo-yo kiosks, and travelled around the country doing shows (eventually landing in San Francisco). Thanks to those opportunities, I’ve never liked to complaining about any of the other fads as they come and go. When you’ve had a career as a “professional yo-yoer”, it’s hard to imagine calling someone out on whatever weird hobby they happen to have. Fad or not.

It has, however, been interesting to see the yo-yo community react to the recent fidget spinner boom. I tend to think that the younger players, who weren’t around for the yo-yo fad and it’s eventual backlash, are quick to jump on the fidget spinner hate-train, while the older players are trying to figure out how to encourage fidgeters to cross over into other skill toys.

As an example, here’s a recent rant by Brandon Vu, who has a stellar series of yo-yo related videos:

Here’s a group of yo-yo and kendama players trying to seamlessly tie in a bunch of fidget spinner tricks into one of their videos:

And here’s Dylan Kowolski showing how to make the World’s Smallest Fidget Spinner using old yo-yo bearings:

And here’s me playing with some magnets… just for shiggles:

 

Analog:Glitch, double exposed images of glitch and street photography

I keep coming back to the intersection of digital and analog. A few years back I had a photo exhibit at Photobooth SF called “Analog:Glitch” which explored this idea with glitched images on Polaroid film. Since then, I’ve been messing around with other ways to combine these two worlds.

In this batch of double exposed photos, I started by creating a large set of digital glitch images then photographed each one with my SLR film camera (by just photographing my computer screen). I then reloaded the film and shot various images from around San Francisco. The resulting images were unplanned, but often lined up in interesting ways. (you can see the full album on Flickr)

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

Analog Glitch

 

How to upload photos to Instagram via the web

Instagram still doesn’t allow you to upload photos via your web browser, but they have recently enabled users who don’t have the Instagram to upload via the mobile web. So here’s how you can upload to instagram via the web using Google Chrome or Safari by spoofing a mobile web browser.

Google Chrome to Instagram:

If you are are using Google Chrome, you’ll need to use an extension like User Agent Switcher (aka “UA Spoofer”) to spoof a mobile device. Once this extension is installed, click the UA Switcher icon to a mobile device setting (like iPhone 6). Then the upload button will appear as a camera icon on the bottom of your screen. Click it to upload your photos from your laptop.

Safari to Instagram:

The Device Emulator is built in to Safari. To get to it, simply go to the Safari menu bar Develop > User Agent > Safari iOS 7 – iPhone.

And that’s how to upload photos to instagram from web without using the mobile app. Have you tried the technique out yet? Let me know how it works for you.

 

American Analog: California State Yo-Yo Contest

I went out to the California State Yo-Yo Contest in Oakland, CA last month. I don’t enter contests anymore, I just like to show up and hang out. I met some new folks and traded tricks with old friends. These were all shot on my Lomography LC-A+, my go to camera, with some of this wonderfully aged 35mm film.

California State Yo-Yo Contest
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